double glazing installer What hours do you work?
What are solar panels?
Is it sunny enough for them to work in the UK?
Is my home suitable for solar panels?
Should I buy them outright?
Will the quality of my electricity suffer?
Do I have to switch the panels on each day?
How much money could I save?
Are solar panels a good investment?
Can solar panels add value to my property?
How long do solar panels last for?
Do I need planning permission for solar panels?
Does my mortgage company need to know?
How can I be sure I'm using the free electricity?
How does this work with my existing gas and electricity supplier?
Q: What hours do you work?

A: We operate 7 days a week 8.00am – 10.00pm. We are happy to make appointments at times to suit our customer’s needs.


Q: What are solar panels?
A: Solar panels are made of photovoltaic (PV) cells, which turn sunlight into electricity.

This electricity can then be fed into your home's mains electricity supply.


Q: Is it sunny enough for them to work in the UK?
A: Yes.

Solar panels don't need direct sunshine - they even work in cloudy or overcast weather.


Q: Is my home suitable for solar panels?
A: The following questions will help you work out if your home could be suitable for solar panels:

  • Do you own your home?
    If you rent your home, you can't install solar panels (unless you negotiate this with your landlord). If your property is leasehold, you'll need to get permission from the freeholder.
  • Do you live in a flat?
    If you live in a basement or mid-floor flat, then solar probably won't to the right solution for you.
  • What direction does your roof face?
    South-facing roofs tend to be the best, but some schemes accept other roofs.
  • Is your roof in the shade?
    Heavily-shaded roofs aren't ideal.
  • How big is your roof?
    There are different solutions for different sized roofs, but the more space you have, the better.
  • Do you live in listed building, or in a conservation area?
    Regulations can sometimes pose a problem.

    Remember, there are exceptions to every rule, so the best way to check if solar is right for you is to get in touch with the company in question. They'll talk you through your options and do a survey if necessary.

Q: Should I buy them outright?

A: Buy your own if:

  • you have £7000-£15000 available to invest.
  • you want to make a profit. Solar panels will give you a return on your money - they could well be a better place to invest than a savings account. With a Feed-in Tariff you could earn up to £1093 a year for generating your own electricity and selling the excess you don't use back to the Grid. Over their 25-year lifetime, your solar panels could earn you £25,000* - more than double the average initial cost of £12,000.
  • you want to make long-term savings on your energy bills. Energy prices will go up over time, so the amount your solar panels save you will go up too.
  • you want to get the best rate on the Feed-in Tariff. It's been predicted that Feed-in Tariff rates could fall for systems installed after April 2012, so sign-up now to take advantage of the best rates.

Q: Will the quality of my electricity suffer?

A: No. You won't notice any difference. If the panels aren't producing much electricity because there's no sun, you'll just use electricity from the Grid instead.


Q: Do I have to switch the panels on each day?
A: No. They are always on.


Q: How much money could I save?
A: You could save 22% or an average of £130 on your electricity bills by using the free electricity your panels generate.

If you buy your solar panels outright, you could also earn £1093 with the Feed-in Tariff.*

The amount you save will go up if energy prices rise, which they almost certainly will.


Q: Are solar panels a good investment?
A: Yes.

If you buy solar panels outright they will give you a good return on your money. In fact, they could well be a better place to invest than a savings account.

With a Feed-in Tariff you could earn up to £1030 a year for generating your own electricity and selling the excess you don't use back to the Grid*. So over their 25-year lifetime, your solar panels could earn you £25,000 - more than double the average initial cost of £12,000.


Q: Can solar panels add value to my property?
A: Yes, they could.

A YouGov survey from 2009 found that home buyers ranked energy efficiency as the third most important reason to buy a property, just behind outdoor space and a garage.

Another 2009 survey from Energy Saving Trust found that 35% of people said they would be willing to pay more for a home where some of their energy supply came from renewable resources.


Q: How long do solar panels last for?
A: Solar panels usually have a 25-year manufacturers' performance guarantees for 25 years.


Q: Do I need planning permission for solar panels?
A: You generally don't need planning consent for solar.

Exceptions are in conservation areas if your solar panels would be visible from the roadside of the property, or if your property has Listed Building status.

It's best to check with your local council planning officer if you're not sure.


Q: Does my mortgage company need to know?
A: Solar may be viewed as a modification by mortgage lenders (just like an extension or dormer window), so it is best to inform them.


Q: How can I be sure I'm using the free electricity?
A: You won't notice the difference between using your free electricity and using electricity from the Grid, and you won't notice the transition. It all happens automatically, behind the scenes. You won't need to think about it.


Q: How does this work with my existing gas and electricity supplier?
A: Nothing will change, except that you'll pay less for your bills. You can stay with your existing energy supplier, who will take readings from your meter as normal and bill you as usual.

*This is based on an average household using 4,500kWh of electricity a year, at a cost of £585. If the solar panels generate 2,000 kWh of electricity, which is paid at a rate of paid 43.3p a unit under a Feed-in Tariff, the household will earn a total of £866. Assuming they use half (1,000 kWh) of the electricity (remember that the time they need to use the most electricity might not be the time when they are generating the most, so they would still have to buy electricity), this will cut £130 off their electricity bill. They sell the other 1,000 kWh of electricity they generate at 3.1p a unit and make £31. The household will cut their electricity bill by £130 and make £866 from their energy (£826 plus £31), meaning a total combined income and saving of £986 in one year.

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